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Patent FAQ

What is a patent? Patents are a type of intellectual property protection that applies to new inventions and innovations, and are essentially a legal safeguard of proprietorship of the invention. They are essentially a reward and incentive for ingenuity.

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Trademark FAQ

What is a trademark? A trademark (also referred to as trade-mark or trade mark) is a way to claim and protect the rights to your brand, slogan, logo, or any other manifestations of your corporate image, and, with that, the goodwill and reputation they have acquired with customers.

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Copyright FAQ

What is a copyright? The purpose of a copyright is to protect owners of creative works such as music, poetry, literature and art while inspiring creativity and continuous production of such works regardless of their commercial value.

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Industrial Design FAQ

What is an industrial design? An industrial design (referred to as a design patent in the United States) is a form of intellectual property that protects the aesthetic or ornamental parts of a product.

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The Value of Intellectual Property

In the past decades, the knowledge economy (the sector of national the economy that is based largely on intangible assets) has grown substantially across the world.The economies of developed countries such as Canada and the United States are becoming increasingly oriented toward innovation . . .

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Determining the Value of Your Intellectual Property

In developed countries around the world, there is an ever-growing shift toward the knowledge economy, or industries based on innovation and intangible assets. As of 2008, intangible assets have composed 31.2% of all wealth in Canada, and the proportion continues to steadily increase.

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Statistics on the Value and Importance of Intellectual Property

How important is intellectual property? Intellectual property is an economic driver in Canada, the U.S. and Europe: 51% of Canada's economy is represented by knowledge-based industries; over time, Canada is becoming increasingly dependent on industries of intangible goods and industries propelled by research and development.

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Should I Use a Non-Disclosure Agreement or File a Provisional Patent Application to Protect My Invention from Others?

It's a dilemma familiar to many inventors: you want to keep your invention secret to make sure you can benefit from it, but you're eager to share the results of your hard work and creativity.

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Licensing Your Patent: Steps and Strategies

Obtaining a patent ought not be the last step in commercializing your invention. Unless you plan to hold on to your patent as a deterrent for industry competitors, you may choose one of several paths available to commercialize your patented invention or monetize your patent . . . This article deals with licensing.

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Patent Searches and Opinions: Patentability vs. Freedom to Operate

One question that generally comes to mind with a new idea or invention is how to protect it . . . The next, and related question concerns whether another party is going to sue you for selling something they have already patented.

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The Basics and Benefits of Industrial Design

An industrial design (or design patent) is a form of intellectual property protection available for design innovators in Canada, the United States and other jurisdictions across the world. It is focused on protecting the visual features of an article, namely its design, shape, pattern or ornament.

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The Basics of Disclosure in Intellectual Property

The process of taking your invention from an idea to a fully operational business venture can be quite challenging. During this time, you may be inclined to share your idea with potential investors to evaluate its profitability, or advertise it through other channels to showcase your ingenuity or check the market potential. However, if you are eventually hoping to protect your rights with a patent or industrial design registration, you may be endangering your rights by revealing your invention or design to others before you apply for protection.

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Developing a Trademark Strategy for Your Business

When you are developing your business, it is important to have a distinct and unique brand that is recognizable by consumers as a symbol of quality and satisfaction. This type of brand, however, is vulnerable to being infringed by competitors in an effort to reap the positive associations it evokes with consumers.

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Protecting Your Trademarks outside Canada

With the reach of the Internet, your brand may extend (or may soon extend) outside of Canada. As registering your trademark in Canada gives you exclusive rights only in Canada, registration of your trademark in other jurisdictions must be done separately.

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Avoiding Intellectual Property Pitfalls When Starting a Business

Entrepreneurs ought to put intellectual property management and protection at the forefront of their concerns in a new business venture. But between daily operations and a focus on growing the business, action to protect innovations and brand reputation is sometimes pushed to the backburner.

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In Which Court Should I Bring My Intellectual Property Dispute?

Intellectual property disputes may be commenced in the Federal Court, provincial superior courts, and small claims courts. While the majority of intellectual property disputes are brought in the Federal Court, provincial superior courts and small claims courts may be appealing alternatives in certain cases.

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How to Monetize Intellectual Property

The development of intellectual property assets is crucial to the innovation, competitiveness and sustained growth of an entity. These assets may also be leveraged as another source of revenue, strengthening overall profits and diversifying risk.

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The Differences between Unregistered and Registered Trademarks in Canada

Building a brand is crucial to the growth and sustained success of a business or enterprise. Accordingly, some aspects of a brand may entail valuable and protectable forms of intellectual property.

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Can I Patent My Idea? The Basics of Patentability in Canada

Most successful businesses are built on innovative ideas. To encourage investment in research and development and to help with the commercialization of new technologies, governments grant patents to applicants of allowable patent applications.

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Patent Maintenance Fees

According to the Patent Act and Patent Rules, an applicant who files a Canadian patent application must pay maintenance fees to maintain the application. Maintenance fees must be paid for each one-year period from the second anniversary of the filing date of the patent application to the nineteenth anniversary . . .

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Why You Should Apply for a Trademark Registration for Your Corporate Name

A corporate name used as the company’s brand is one of the most valuable trademark assets of a business. Your brand will represent the quality of your goods and services and evoke a particular image and reputation amongst consumers. A strong brand will help facilitate sales of goods and services with which it is identified.

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How Long Does It Take to Get a Patent?

In Canada, it takes an average of 37.8 months from requesting examination (which may be done at filing) to get a patent. In the United States, it takes average of 25.7 months from the filing of a patent application to get a patent.

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5 Benefits of Registering Your Trademark in Canada

In Canada, trademark rights can be acquired for both registered and unregistered trademarks. While a trademark does not need to be registered to be protectable, registration of a trademark provides significant benefits for the trademark owner including . . .

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Innovation Funding and Grants

A list of sources of funding and grants for innovators in Canada.

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Foreign Associates: Information and Documents Needed for Canadian Trademark Application Filings in the Canadian Trademark Office

This page is intended to inform lawyers and trademark agents located outside of Canada as to what documents and information will be needed before the Canadian Trademark Office for a corresponding Canadian trademark application filing.

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What Is the Difference between a Patent Search and a Patentability Assessment?

In brief, a patent search is only the first step in a patentability assessment. A patentability assessment includes a patent search, a detailed analysis of the references uncovered and a written report on patentability.

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Key Features of Canadian Patent Prosecution for Foreign Associates

Generally speaking, prosecuting patent applications in Canada is similar to prosecuting patent applications in the United States. Here are particular features of the Canadian Patent Act and Patent Rules that an instructing agent should take note of . . .

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Ten Key IP Questions You Should Consider When Starting a Business

You need to concern yourself with intellectual property rights at the start of any new business. If you fail to respect the intellectual property rights of others, you may become liable for monetary damages and you could be forced to redesign your product or service or to rebrand your products, services or business.

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